Red Ribbon Week in the Coachella Valley

By | October 23, 2013 at 11:44 am | No comments | Columns, Education

By Curtis Hendricks

Our local schools will be filled with the color red this week and next in support of national Red Ribbon Week. The motto for Red Ribbon Week is “Drug Free.” Schools help students to remember and celebrate being drug free through many daily activities, inspirational speeches, and creative art projects that display the student’s active roll and support in remaining drug free.

Shadow Hills High School is holding a blood drive closed to the students and staff of the high school. With every able bodied student that donates blood, the student will receive a five dollar gift card to In ‘N’ Out Burger. The program is through Desert Blood Services. Students must be a Shadow Hills student and need parent permission if under the age of sixteen. I commend Shadow Hills for holding such an event for their students. An event such as a blood drive gives the chance for students to learn not only the importance of staying drug free, but the opportunity to unselfishly help someone they may never meet.

Parents need to be actively involved in Red Ribbon Week. I am not suggesting that you take time off of work, but with all the talk of drugs and substance abuse, your children may have questions and curiosities. Your kids will not always come to you for help, which means you actively need to seek them out and talk to them. Also, try participating with your kids in the school events. If your child is one of the students giving blood, try also giving blood at a local blood donation facility. The simple act will show your child that you support their efforts, approve of their actions, and may bring them closer to you.

The goal for the week is to make a direct point to our children, and the children of others, that drugs are not a good life choice. Whatever the drug, if abused, children have a smaller chance of a healthy and successful life. I know we all want what is best for all of our children. I understand that your child could not possibly be using drugs, or even thinking about using drugs, but why ignore the slim chance they are?

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